Thursday, December 16, 2010

Where Are the Black Golfers























Joseph Bramlett made a putt during the final stage on PGA Tour Qualifying School to become the 1st African American golfer since Tiger Woods to earn a PGA Tour card. When Tiger Woods won the 1997 Masters Tournament there was speculation that professional golf would be flooded with African American golfers following in Tiger’s footsteps, but nothing could have been further from the truth. In reality, it has taken 13 years for a black golfer to earn a PGA Tour card since Tiger’s historic win at Augusta.

There is quite a bit of speculation as to why this invasion of black golfers failed to materialize. The answer is very simple. Young black golfers who possess the talent to play on the PGA and LPGA Tour lack access to the advanced training and instruction required to play golf on the highest level. Unless these talented black golfers receive the best training, top notch instruction, and get the opportunity to compete against the best competition, it might be 13 more years before a black golfer follows Joseph Bramlett on the PGA Tour.

The biggest misnomer about black golfers and professional golf is that the First Tee Program was established as a training ground for professional black golfers. Nothing could be further from the truth. The First Tee Program is a wonderful program that introduces youth of all races and backgrounds to the game of golf. The program also uses golf as a way to teach participants important life skills that will benefit them in the future. At its’ core the First Tee strives to create productive, responsible and well-rounded citizens, not professional golfers.

In order to see more black golfers out on the PGA and LPGA Tour, they must be provided with access to the best instruction and training available. A local teaching professional or golf coach doesn’t have the resources to help take a talented golfer to the level required to play professional golf. I have always been a proponent of supporting our own and the African American community should take a hard look at itself and look for a solution to this problem. Before we ask for help from other sources, let’s start by helping each other and making a commitment to get more black golfers into professional golf.


Edward Wanambwa

GolfWiz Blog

Editor

www.golfwriter.com


Buffalo Trace: The Hallmark Of Kentucky Bourbon



If you think Kentucky is famous only for its horse racing and college basketball, you’ve missed a lot. It’s most famous product is Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey. Known the world over for its fine quality, 95% of all bourbon is made in the Lexington, Kentucky, area. Here, a half dozen distilleries (all within an easy drive) have formed a “Kentucky Bourbon Trail” where visitors can spend a day or more visiting various facilities and learning about (and taste) Kentucky Bourbon. The trail consists of six well-known bourbon distilleries., Four Roses, Heaven Hill, Jim Beam, Maker's Mark, Wild Turkey, and Woodford Reserve. See .

Buffalo Trace, a bourbon maker located near the state capital city of Frankfort, is the oldest continually distillery operating in the United States. Just a short distance from Lexington, it offers daily (except Sunday and holidays) tours of its operations. Buffalo Trace Distillery welcomes visitors for tours and shopping in our Visitor Center year-round. Gift Shop hours are
Monday through Friday: 9 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.Saturday: 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Tour hours are
Monday through Friday 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. departing every hour. For further information see: www.buffalotrace.com

According to historians whiskey and other distilled spirits, such as rum, played an important role in both the American colonies and in the new democratic union. As early as 1657, a rum distillery was operating in Boston. It was highly successful and within a generation the production of rum became colonial New England's largest and most prosperous industry.
Even before the American Revolution, whiskey had become the preferred way to use surplus grains in the frontier settlements west of the Appalachian Mountains. The expansion of a corn belt in Kentucky and Ohio had created a corn glut. It cost more to transport corn or grain than it could bring on the eastern markets, so farmers distilled it into "liquid assets" that could easily be shipped or bartered. Practically every farmer made whiskey.

A whiskey tax led to the first test of federal power, the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794. It was put down by federal troops ordered in by President Washington. After serving as president, George Washington became probably the new nation's largest whiskey distiller.
Its believed by 1810 there were at least 2,000 distillers producing more than 1.76 million gallons of whiskey. Annual alcohol consumption (including wine, beer, etc.) may have been as high as 8 gallons per person. I’ll drink to that.














Story by:
James Weaver
GolfWiz Blog
Senior Travel Writer

Friday, December 10, 2010

Joseph Bramlett earns PGA Tour 2011 Card


Congratulations to Joseph Bramlett for his historic accomplishment.



Jason Sobel Story:

http://sports.espn.go.com/golf/news/story?id=5892269

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

Arnie’s Hometown



Latrobe Country Club

Someone once asked world famous golfer Arnold Palmer if he could choose anywhere he would want to live, where would it be. “That’s easy,” Palmer replied, “in Latrobe, Pennsylvania.” While many celebrity athletes choose to live far from the place of their childhood and youth, not Palmer. And the widely acclaimed champion golfer has defiantly left his mark on this modest steel town just 40 miles southeast of Pittsburgh along U.S. Route 30, the old Lincoln Highway.

Set in the beautiful mountains of the Pennsylvania’s Laurel Highlands, it’s the home of Latrobe Speciality Steel Company that produces high quality steel for the aerospace and technology markets. Saint Vincent College, a Benedictine school where the Pittsburgh Steelers hold their preseason training each summer, is located here, and its not far from Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous Fallingwater.

Latrobe was once home to Rolling Rock Beerbefore it was sold and moved to New Jersey, and the banana split (ice cream sundae) was invented here in 1904.In 1920, a group of local industrialists, bankers, and professional men formed the Latrobe Country Club and built a nine hole golf courseon 63 acres of rough, hilly terrain. Helping with the construction project was a local teenager Milfred J. Deacon “Deke” Palmer, who would later be hired as club superintendent in charge of keeping the course in good condition. When the club professional left a few years later, he is given this position as well.

Deacon’s young son Arnold would help his dad around the club and after members had finished for the day they would play a few holes of golf. Deacon had cut off a set of clubs to fit the youngster. The young Palmer plays golf at Latrobe High School losing only one match in four years and wins the Pennsylvania State Championship at age 17. He receives a golf scholarship to Wake Forest College in North Carolina winning a number of championships there.

After three years service with the U.S. Coast Guard, the talented young golfer wins his first the U.S. Amateur Championship at the Country Club of Detroit at Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan, in 1954. In November of that year, Palmer turns professional and one month later marries Winnie Walzer. Soon the young couple acquire a pleasant six-room ranch house near the Latrobe Country Club.

Over the next few years he wins numerous professional tournaments and becomes one of the tour’s top money earners. Palmer wins The Masters Championship at Augusta, Georgia, (his first of four wins here) in 1958. Following his first Masters win he meets President Dwight D. Eisenhower who invites Palmer to golf with him. This begins a long series of friendly personal relationships with U.S. Presidents. One wall in his office reception area is devoted to photos and letters he has received from presidents over the years.

For Palmer’s 37th birthday his wife Winnie surprised him by secretly inviting the Eisenhowers (then retired in Gettysburg, PA) to visit for a weekend. The President with small suitcase in hand rings the doorbell and Winne sends her husband to answer it. Palmer is speachless as Eisenhower says, “Coulod you put up an old man for the night.”

In the early 1960s the Latrobe Country Club purchases additional adjacent land and Arnold Palmer and his father design and supervise construction of an additional nine hole course and improvements to the old course. In 1971, Palmer acquires full ownership of the Club. Many more improvements are made to the course and Club facilities and the 6,407 yard, par 72 course matures into a beautiful and challenging test of golf. Today Amy Saunders (Palmer’s daughter) and her husband Roy manage the Latrobe property as well as the Bay Hill Club and Lodge in Orlando, Florida, also owned by Palmer.

The greens are particularly difficult at the Latrobe Country Club. “Just the way Mr. Palmer likes them,” says Doc Giffin, Palmer’s long time assistant (a former sports writer for the Pittsburgh Press and later PGA tour media director). “They roll the greens here every day and they are exceptionally smooth and fast.”Palmer’s name can be seen in various locations
around Latrobe. There’s Arnold Palmer Drive, Arnold Palmer Motors (Buick and Cadillac), and Arnold Palmer Regional Airport. He owns and still flies a Cessna Citation X the fastest business jet.

Another place his name appears is at the Arnold Palmer Pavilion of the University of Pittsburgh Health Systems cancer hospital and research facility here. Palmer successfully battled cancer in the late 1990s and his first wife Winne died from cancer in 1999. Since then he has contributed millions toward research and treatment of the disease.

Near his home is a small white frame building with Palmer's familiar golf umbrella logo above the door. His office is located here along with displays of dozens of trophies, photos, awards, and letters. An oil portrait of Palmer by Norman Rockwell is here along with 15 covers from Sports Illustrated featuring the champion golfer. Mulligan, Palmer’s Golden Labrador, is a familiar sight around the building and grounds. Next to his office is a workshop where he works on his clubs for an hour or two almost every day.While the Latrobe Country Club is a private facility, there is plenty to do and see in the area.
Persons planning to visit here, should begin at http://www.laurelhighlandscvb.


Arnold Palmers Office


Reception Room Presidential Display

James Weaver
GolfWiz Blog
Senior Travel Writer

Saturday, October 9, 2010

Ybor City, Tampa: Where Cigars Are Still King

Story by: Jim Weaver
Travel Editor, New York Trend






At the turn of the 20th century, Tampa, Florida,was the “Cigar Capital of the World.” Ybor City, a section of Tampa located near the port,was the center of cigar manufacturing. High quality cigar tobacco was imported from Cuba and thousands of skilled workers hand rolled millions of fine cigars. Cigar smoking was popular and it was not until after the First World War that cigarettes became more fashionable. Gradually, over the decades, the cigar industrydeclined and what was once a prosperous part of the city declined with it.

One by one the cigar companies closed and the community, once a vibrant center of ethnic culture (Italian, German, Spanish, and Cuban), deteriorated. Then came the interstate highway. In the 1960s, Route I-4 (connecting Tampa with Orlando and Daytona) was built through Ybor City eliminating much of its residential housing.

In the past 20 years, however, Ybor City has made a spectacular comeback, and today it is once again an attractive, lively, welcoming community where locals and visitors can find a great mix of history, ethnic charm, and modern amenities. Today its a popular dining and night life destination. Most famous is the Columbia Restaurant, in business since 1905, and featuring fine Spanish cuisine and Flamenco dancers. The food and service here are exceptional. For authentic Cuban food visitors will want to try the popular La Tropicana. There are many other fine restaurants including the Acropolis Greek Tavern and Samurai Blue Sushi & Sake Bar.

While there are now three hotels in Ybor City,only one offers a taste of the Ybor’s glorious past. The Don Vincente de Ybor Historic Inn is a favorite for weddings, and many guests enjoy its charm and beauty, something often missing in modern hotels. Built in 1895, it was originally housed a land development company. It stood empty for several decades, before a multimillion dollar restoration brought back to its original glory. Today, the charming boutique hotel offers 16 guest rooms with elegant oriental rugs, ornate furniture, four-poster canopied beds, and white cast iron balconies. It is well located within an easy walk of restaurants, shops, and historic attractions and there is free parking on site.

While Ybor is an interesting place throughout the year, Aficionado Days celebrates Ybor’s
history as the “Cigar Capital of the World.” Cigar smokers from all parts converge on Ybor to enjoy some of the finest hand rolled tobaccoavailable anywhere. Cigar making demonstrations are held and there are opportunities to learn about the finer points of cigar selection and smoking.

The upscale, two day event begins Saturday afternoon with a Tapas Trail visiting more than a dozen of Ybor’s fine dining establishments. This is followed by a PartySmoker at the historic Italian Club. Sunday brunch is held at the world famous Columbia Restaurant. There are a number of fine cigar shops in Ybor including King Carona, Tampa Sweathearts, El Sol, and Stogie Castillo, all offering a wide selection of fine cigars and smoking accessories.


Learn more at www.ybor.org and http://www.visittampabay.com



Thursday, September 9, 2010

Tampa, Florida: Bern’s Winefest Is Florida’s Premier Wine Tasting Experience

Story by:
James weaver
Travel Editor
New York Trends


Have you eaten a truly great steak lately? Or had a suburb glass of wine? What about a truly memorable dining experience? Sometimes you find the greatest things in unlikely places. Who would have thought that Tampa, Florida, would be home to one of the finest steak restaurants in America? Bern’s Steak House, in my mind, is the very best you’ll find anywhere. But Bern’s may be just as famous for its wine. With a wine cellar of a tens of thousands of bottles, it offers one of the largest and most extensive selection in the world. The wine list is bigger than a old family bible.

Each Spring for the past 13 years, Bern’s has hosted a wine festival to treat its guests to an extensive and remarkable selection of fine wines from across America and the world. The multi-day event draws thousands of guests both wine aficionados and those who simply enjoy an occasional glass of wine with dinner. There are many dozens of wineries presenting their finest vintage and hundreds of exceptional wines to choose from at the tastings and other festival events. The Winefest features several ticketed events including dinners, parties, and grand tasting.

Internationally recognized wine experts explain the qualities of each vintage and describe the range of perceived flavor, aroma and general characteristics. The five basic steps of tasting wine -- color, swirl, smell, taste, and savor are employed. During this process, the guests look for clarity, character, expressiveness, and complexity in each wine. When a wine is well balanced, it is said to have achieved a harmonious fusion. Its music to your palate.
A silent auction is held during Winefest where guests can bid on a fine selection of unusual and often rare wines. The proceeds go to the Bern’s Scholarship Fund. All wines served at the Winefest are available for purchase at Bern’sWine & Spirits, the restaurant’s retail outlet.

Known throughout the country for its extensive wine collection, perfectly aged and prepared steaks and famous dessert room, Bern’s offers its guests a world-class, incomparable dining experience. When Bern Laxer opened the restaurant in 1956, he envisioned Bern’s as Art in Steaks. It still is.

Today, son David Laxer and Chef de Cuisine Habteab Hamde continue Bern’s tradition of excellence with a gastronomic adventure that includes prime steaks cut-to-order, numerous choices of caviar, fresh seafood and organic vegetables grown on the Bern’s farm. The menu also boasts a weekly specials page offering fresh oysters, seasonal delights and entrees with suggested wine pairings.

For oenophiles (wine connoisseurs), the 6,500 label wine collection, a perennial Wine Spectator Grand Award winner, provides ample opportunity for exploration. After dinner, guests can relax and enjoy a Bern’s signature dessert or one of more than a thousand after-dinner spirits, wines, and cordial served in the unique dessert room constructed from old wine barrels. When you dine here be sure to ask for a tour of the kitchen and wine cellar (amazing).
Learn more at www.bernssteakhouse.com


Travelers to Tampa, Florida, should also view www.visittampabay.com





Thursday, May 20, 2010

Sarasota, Florida: Home Of The Oldest Golf Course in America





Several communities across America have claimed they were first to provide a golfing facility. The most popular of these claims comes from Yonkers, New York , where two gentlemen from Dunfermline, Scotland, Robert Lockhart and John Reid, constructed a three hole golfing ground in 1888. However, many Sarasotans disagree with the Yonkers claim and local historical records support their position.
In December 1885, John Hamilton Gillespie arrived in the southwest Florida fishing village of Sarasota. Gillespie brought his hickory golf sticks with him from Scotland and by May 1886 he had constructed a two hole golfing ground between what is now Main Street and Ringling Boulevard. By 1888 the number of golf holes increased to four and a practice range was added to the mix. This course increased to 9 holes and a clubhouse by 1901 and by 1906 a full 18 hole course was in operation two years before the Yonkers course.

Today, Bobby Jones Golf Club is a 45 hole municipal facility named for the legendary Robert Tyre Jones, Jr., who personally dedicated the course on Sunday, February 13, 1927.
The original 18 holes were designed in 1926 by the famed course architect Donald Ross. Nine additional holes were constructed in 1952 and another nine were added in 1967. The John H. Gillespie Executive Course was completed in 1977.

In 1930, Bobby Jones accomplished one of the most amazing feats in sports history, the Grand Slam of Golf. In honor of these championships the British Course front nine is named for his British Amateur victory at St. Andrews and the back nine for his British Open success at Hoylake. The American Course honors Jones' championships in the U.S. Amateur at Merion and the U.S. Open at Interlachen. Jones is the

During its eighty three years Bobby Jones courses have challenged such immortals as Walter Hagen, Tommy Armour, Gene Sarazen and even the "Babe", George Herman Ruth. In 1940 the longest playoff for a PGA event was held at both the Bobby Jones Course and nearby Sarabay C.C. when the PGA Seniors Championship tournament needed 36 playoff holes before Otto Hackbarth bested Jack Hutchinson 294 to 295. Past LPGA greats including Patty Berg, Babe Dedrickson Zaharias and Louise Suggs made Bobby Jones a regular tour stop in the mid 1950's. The current British Course record is 62 set by Sarasotan, Paul Azinger, in 1980.

Sarasota’s Bobby Jones Golf Complex attracts visitors from around the world who come to play the fairways and greens steeped in golfing history.
Learn more at www.bobbyjonesgolfclub.com and www.sarasotafl.org if you plan to visit the area.




James C. Weaver
jweaver35@comcast.net

Travel Editor
New York Trend, Metropolitan NYC
NewYorkTrendOnLine.com (web)
Travel Correspondent
ilreporter.com (web)
The Morning Telegraph, Tyler, TX
Journal & Topics, Suburban Chicago
Journal-Press, Northern Virginia
Independent Feature Writer
Chestnut Hill Local, Philadelphia
The Crafts Report
CraftsReport.com (web)
Antiques & Collecting
Carousel News & Trader
Old Time Herald
DelMarVa Quarterly
GolfWiz (web)
AANR e-Bulletin (web)

Member:
International Food, Wine
& Travel Writers Association
International Association
of Black Travel Writers

LPGA International: Among Florida’s Finest Golf Courses


There must be a thousand golf courses in sunshine state of Florida, but among the very best are the two courses are the LPGA International. These outstanding courses are open to men and women members and to the general public. Located in Daytona Beach. they’re just minutes from the famous beach and the world renowned Daytona International Speedway. The Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA), headquartered here, oversees more than 800 golf events worldwide each year.

Opened in 1994, the LPGA International complex features two golf courses distinctly different in design that have hosted numerous LPGA Tour Championships. The Champions course is now the venue of the final LPGA Tour Qualifying School. There’s also a first-class driving range, three regulation-length practice holes, and a clubhouse that boasts all the fine amenities you might expect in a major resort facility.

The Rees Jones designed Champions Course is both challenging and picturesque. There are elevated tees and greens, the dramatically rolling fairways bordered by high mounds and old-growth trees, and many of natural and man-made hazards. Water is in play 10 of the 18 holes. The 18-hole Champions plays 7,088 yards from the tips for a par of 72.
The LPGA’s 1997 signature Arthur Hills Legends Course challenges golfers at every turn. The par 72 layout is a classic at 6,984 yards. Hills used a superb natural setting to create a masterpiece in playability and variety. It features natural wetlands, narrow pine corridors, small greens and strategically placed water hazards.

The Legends calls for the player to use their mind ahead of their muscles. Played from the proper tees, it poses an appropriate challenge to more accomplished players and fairness to high handicappers, seniors, women and junior golfers.

The Practice Facility at LPGA International is larger and superior to any I have ever encountered. Totally unique, it is what one might expect from the home of the LPGA Tour and the Teaching and Club Professional Division. The main practice area features an 80,000 square foot surface area of natural turf and 10 target greens. With a combination of perfect turf and high quality practice balls, there is no better place to practice.

There are six practice putting greens throughout our facility so that it’s never too crowded to practice this vital area of your game. Several of these greens have bunkers with different face heights to enable realistic bunker practice. There is also a bunker reserved only for fairway bunker shot practice.

In addition, there is a three-hole Practice Academy course that features a par 5, par 4 and a par 3. It is maintained to the same high standard as our two championship courses.
The practice facility hosts numerous college golf teams for their annual spring training, international teams, local school teams and a wide variety of golf schools.
LPGA International offers world-class golf instruction, school, and clinics. Florida is renowned as a top destination for golfers worldwide, and the LPGA encourages groups and individuals of all levels and ages to come experience our world-class golf instruction.
To learn more about these opportunities view www.lpgainternational.com. Also, see www.daytonabeachcvb.org to plan you trip to the area.



James C. Weaver
jweaver35@comcast.net

Travel Editor
New York Trend, Metropolitan NYC
NewYorkTrendOnLine.com (web)
Travel Correspondent
ilreporter.com (web)
The Morning Telegraph, Tyler, TX
Journal & Topics, Suburban Chicago
Journal-Press, Northern Virginia
Independent Feature Writer
Chestnut Hill Local, Philadelphia
The Crafts Report
CraftsReport.com (web)
Antiques & Collecting
Carousel News & Trader
Old Time Herald
DelMarVa Quarterly
GolfWiz (web)
AANR e-Bulletin (web)

Member:
International Food, Wine
& Travel Writers Association
International Association
of Black Travel Writers

Monday, May 17, 2010

Adam Scott wins 2010 Valero Texas Open

South African Adam Scott wins the 2010 Valero Texas Open to claim his 7th career PGA Tour win.

video courtesy of yahoo sports

RE: Tiger Woods Withdraws from the 2010 Players Championship


Tiger Woods addresses the neck injury that forced him to withdraw from the 2010 Players Championship.

video courtesy of Yahoo Sports


Hank Haney Resigns as Tiger Woods Swing Coach

After 6 years as Tiger Woods swing coach, Hank Haney announced his resignation. "I believe at this time that it is in both of our best interests for me to step aside as Tiger's coach," Haney said in a statement to The Golf Channel. "I will always look back upon our past half dozen years together as my best days in professional golf."


video courtesy of yahoo sports


RE: Monday Tour Wrap Up 05/17/10


Video courtesy - Yahoo Sports

Sunday, May 9, 2010

RE: Tim Clark wins 2010 Players Championship

South Africa's Time Clark won the 2010 Players Championship for his first PGA Tour Win.

Video Courtesy of Yahoo Sports



Sunday, May 2, 2010

Rory McIlroy wins the 2010 Quail Hollow Championshi


Northern Irelands Rory McIlroy won the 2010 Quail Hollow Championship shooting a course record 62 on Sunday for his first PGA Tour Win.

video courtesy of yahoo sports


Friday, April 30, 2010

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Hampton University Captures 2010 WCGC Title

The Women Collegiate Golf Championship was held this weekend at the City Club of Marietta in Marietta, GA . The tournament was rained out on Saturday but managed to hold an 18 hole competition.

Congratulations to:

  • 2010 Champions - Hampton University - 319
  • 2nd Place - Bethune Cookman Universisty - 322
  • 3rd Place - South Carolina State University - 329
  • Medalist: 1st Place - Nicloe West - Hampton University - 76 (tie breaker)
  • 2nd Place - Honesty Biggers - South Carolina State - 76
  • 3rd Place - Kala Williams - Hampton University - 79
for more details visit: http://www.womeningolffoundation.org


Edward S. Wanambwa
Senior Editor, African American Golfers Digest


Wednesday, April 28, 2010

RE: Woods and Mickelson Face Off At Quail Hollow




























(Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)


On the eve of the 2010 Quail hollow Championship the golf world is abuzz about Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson playing in their first tournament following the Masters. Phil Mickelson picked up his 3rd green jacket and his 4th major two weeks ago in Augusta and Tiger Woods made his much anticipated return to professional golf with a good showing finishing in a tie for 4th place.

But the real story about this week about the Tiger Woods vs Phil Mickelson rivalry. Fans have been waiting a long time for someone to step up and challenge Tiger. The golf world wants a modern day Arnold vs Jack rivalry. A few have tried but no one has had the success the Mickelson has had against Woods. Phil is a tenacious competitor who has gained more and more confidence with every win. He is now poised to challenge Tiger for the title of #1 player in the world.

Don't get me wrong. By no means am I saying that Tiger is done. In fact I think that a good rival can only make Tiger that much better. We all know that Tiger hates to lose and when he has someone pushing him he usually rises to the occasion. I am looking forward to this week at Quail Hollow to see if the Tiger of old returns or if Phil takes another step towards becoming the #1 player in the world.


Edward S. Wanambwa
Senior Editor, African American Golfers Digest
www.thegolfwriter.com
www.africanamericangolfersdigest.com

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

RE: Clearview Golf Club An American Landmark


On December 31st 2009 we Lost a golf Pioneer in Mr. William Powell. Mr. Powell was the first African American to design, construct and own a professional golf course in the United States. Powell was fond of saying "The only color that matters is the color of the greens".


Jason Bohn Wins Zurich Classic


( AP Photo)
Bohn won his second PGA Tour title on Sunday, finishing at 18-under 270 to grab the winners purse of $1,152,000 in the Zurich Classic. Bohn, who also won the 2005 B.C. Open, had it going early, shooting an opening 65 and leading after each round. Congratulations to Jason Bohn

Sunday, April 25, 2010

Lee Janzen has a strong Finish at the 2010 Zurich Classic



(AP Photo)

Two Time U.S. Open Champion Lee Janzen finished in 4th place at the 2010 Zurich Classic on the PGA Tour. Janzen fired a final round 3-under par 69 to finish at 13-under par for the tournament. Lee Janzen wears Liquid Tempo golf shirts. The coolest shirt on the planet. COngratulations Lee Janzen on a great week.

Kevin Hall finished T-3 at Hooters Tour Event


Kevin Hall had a great week at the Crystal lake Open in Hampton, GA Kevin shot a final round 4-under par 68 to finish in a tie for 3rd place one shot off the lead at 13 under par for the tournament. Congratulations to Kevin Hall ! Great Job !

Saturday, April 24, 2010


Kevin hall shot 67 today.. he is tied for 2nd and one stroke back of the leader on the Hooters Tour. THe Tournament is currently rain delayed

Lorena Ochoa Announces Her Retirement From Golf


(AP Photo)


World # 1 Female Golfer and 2-time major winner announced her retirement from professional golf. In an emotional press conference the 28 year old Ochoa bid farewell to the game she loves.

AP Story:




Thursday, April 22, 2010

Kevin Hall has a great 1st round in Hooters Tour Event


Kevin Hall fired a 4-under 68 today at the Hooter Tour Crystal lake Open in Hampton, GA. He had a bogey free round and ended the day tied for 5th place.

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Why Golf Is Special






(Photo: Scott Hallern/Getty Images)

Would Lebron James or Kobe Bryant call a foul on themselves after they hit the game winning shot? Would Peyton Manning or Drew Brees throw a flag on themselves during the Superbowl? I don’t think that would ever happen. But this weekend at the Verizon Heritage PGA Tour Event Tour Player Brian Davis called a penalty on himself on the first playoff hole against Jim Furyk. Davis hit his approach shot into a waste bunker adjacent to the 18th hole and when he played his third shot out of the hazard his club brushed a twig thereby violating rule13.4 against moving a loose impediment during a takeaway.

What makes this so unbelievable is that no one saw the infraction. It wasn’t until Davis notified a rules official that he might have violated the rules of golf did anyone become aware of the breech.Davis was the only one who saw the twig move. It wasn’t until after the CBS slow motion cameras focused on his club that the world saw the tiny twig move during his back swing. He could have easily gotten away with it. But in his own words Davis said “I couldn’t have lived with myself, knowing I had violated the rules”.

What an amazing act of honor and integrity. The two-stroke penalty Davis incurred cost him not only a chance to win his first PGA Tour tournament, but over $700,000 in prize money. I am not sure how many athletes would have done the same thing Brian Davis did at the Verizon Heritage. But that’s what makes the game of golf special. Its gentlemen’s game and honor and integrity are an integral to the sport. Brian Davis is a shining example of how you’re supposed to play the game. When you cheat in golf you only cheat yourself. Kudos to Brian Davis a true gentleman and a champion in my eyes.


Edward S. Wanambwa

Senior Editor, African American Golfers Digest

www.thegolfwriter.com

www.africanamericangolfersdigest.com


Friday, April 16, 2010

The Birdie Sisters: Erica and Myah Jackson


I had the pleasure of being interviewed by the Birdie Sisters Erica and Myah Jackson. They are the Williams sisters of golf. It was such a thrill being interviewed by these remarkable young ladies. The absolute best interview I have ever had. I willpost the show when it airs. in the mean time please visit their website: www.birdiesisters.com

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